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    12 Simple Ways to Sell More Books (guest post)

    Thursday, March 24th, 2011

    Most authors want to sell books, but many never will. At least not more than a handful.
    mari smith
    The #1 way to sell books is to get yours to stand out from the millions of others that are out there.

    Below are 12 very easy to implement “stand out” ideas.

    1. Article marketing

    One of the oldest online marketing strategies is still one of the most effective. Writing articles that tie into the theme of your book should be very easy. After all, you are a writer.

    Even if you don’t have a lot of time on your hands you can take portions of a chapter and create several articles.

    At the end of the article add in something that drives readers back to your blog, website or landing page to opt in for something of value. Yes, ethical bribes still work.

    2. Tell people

    You need to let your friends, family, colleagues, clients, peers and just about anybody you know that your book was published. After all, if you’re not willing to talk about your book others may not be either.

    3. Reviews from happy readers

    Third party endorsements (verbal or written) are a great way to have your book stand out. Just today I began reading a book my nutritionist recommended.

    Recently Sandi hosted a workshop on food cravings. During her presentation she recommended the audience read two books. I wrote both down and upon returning home immediately ordered the Kindle version of the one that most caught my attention.

    Once I’m done with the book I will write an Amazon review. It’s likely I will even blog about the book. Viral marketing at its best.

    4. Facebook

    Start a page for your book. I have done that for the last two books I was the marketing director for. The strategy worked well in that we created interest in the book before it was published.

    Once you start the page you need to let everyone know about it. Be actively involved with those who “liked” the page. Otherwise the page is a stagnant piece and does you no good.

    5. LinkedIn groups

    A fantastic way to build a loyal following of potential buyers of your book(s) is to start a LinkedIn group that is specific to the theme or genre of your book.

    Does a group take work? Yes. But so do all the other methods outlined in this article.

    The fact is, anything you do is going to take effort.

    6. Blogging

    By far one of the best things you can do to build visibility, credibility, market reach and SEO is blogging.

    Here are only a handful of ideas for what you can blog about regarding your book.

    7. FAQ’s

    Frequently asked questions as they pertain to the theme of your book. If you’re not sure what the main questions your potential readers have, ask. Even if you have a pretty good idea, ask.

    One way to do this is with Survey Monkey. When someone completes your survey give them a gift for doing so without requiring any opt in. This creates a win/win.

    Try the survey method. Not only can you post results on your blog, you can write articles and develop products based on the answers.

    8. Tips

    Based on the theme of your book you can write tips that are specific to the interests of your market.

    Just like I did with this posting, you can do so with your book.

    9. Interviews with other authors in the same genre

    Why not find other authors who have a following and interview them? Not only will you have great information for your blog, you will build credibility by association.

    10. Case studies

    If your book is a how to, you can profile those who got specific results based on the information your book outlines. This not only increases potential reader interest, it substantiates the value of your book’s information.

    11. Guest Blogging

    One of the fastest and most effective ways to increase market reach and visibility for you and your book is to be a featured blogger on other high traffic blogs.

    12. Videos

    Without a doubt video is one of the most powerful marketing tools you can use to promote your book. You can do book trailers, short readings, or simply share stories as they relate to your book. Be sure to be animated during your shooting and use keywords both in the spoken part of the video and the title and description.

    So there you have it… 12 simple ways to gain visibility for your book(s).

    3 Simple Steps to Begin Making Money Online Right Now! FREE online course from Kathleen Gage. Kathleen works with spiritually aware speakers, authors, coaches and consultants who are ready to turn their knowledge into money making products and services. http://www.streetsmartsmarketing.com/3simple.htm

    Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6010505

    Top 10 Ways to Establish Your Expert Credentials

    Wednesday, January 20th, 2010

    Pam Perry is an EzineArticles.com Expert

    10) The news media is now everyone who can find you on the Web. Are your ideas being “broadcast” so more people find you?  Are you creating new ideas, and moving forward and bringing those who search on problems to find your solutions?   Please read that once more: People know their problems; they don’t know your solutions.  That’s the commonality, and why a campaign we’ve run for a year on the phrase “disgruntled employees” that was based on an Alan Weiss news release headline — “Creating Loyal Employees” — has had thousands of click-throughs. Have you made a list of your clients’ problems?    The blogs, comments and news releases you push via our system, reach the media, the Internet, syndication – and, most importantly, your buyers, the public that search the Internet.

    9) Speak? Train? Consult? Coach? You’ve bottled a lot of information and experience over the years.   Are you re-packaging it?    Sure that “book as a credential” is what everyone says you need, and that’s a great welcome token, give-away or deal sweetener.  I’ve left it off this list, for I don’t think “having a book makes you an expert.” You have to be an expert before you are able to author the book.  A book is a fancy business card, as most people never get past the dust jacket.  Want to hire a great dust jacket person and write four chapters?    Then, be very careful which chapter you run first, for consultants have to listen and come up with the solution. Speakers offer a great overview and insights but often are not responsible for client success. Trainers help you with defined problems and offer programs, and coaches seem caught in a time warp of pay, based on time not success.   What are you selling?   Solutions, ideas, driving lessons or therapy?   If you have a book, it should start conversations which end in conversions and business for you.

    8) Publish a bio. Make sure it comes up #1 at Google when your name is searched.  Make sure when people “Google” you they see your bio and your accomplishments first.  Remember this is very different than #1 where you are creating a “search phrase” so that  people who don’t know your name can find you.

    7) Use Skip’s 20-20 media rule. First, make a list of your best 20 revenue customers. Then, figure out which media outlets they follow.  Make up a list of the 20 editors or journalists that most influence your 20 money makers.  Create a media tip list for those 20 journalists: On an IRREGULAR basis, only when you have ideas or things you know they want, sent it to them.  Don’t fall into the trap I saw when I interned at the Larry King Show decades ago.  I asked the producer why he was throwing away some of mail unopened, and he said: “I’ve seen stuff with that return address before and it wasn’t interesting.” Send out good ideas, not just about you, but as a “cub reporter” for your list. (Thanks to Skip Weitzen, author of “HyperGrowth,” for his added advice here.)

    6) Figure out your “needle-in-the-haystack” uniqueness. Use those phrases as your meta-tags, on your Web site, in your “elevator speech.”  It should be two or three word and put it everywhere — from your business cards to your vanity license plate.  Use WordTracker.com and KWMap.com.  Watch my videos at www.WebHandbook.com to learn how.

    5) Get inbound links to your URL: ExpertClick.com has 48,000.  Test your count by entering “links: and your URL” into Google.  Try it with both the “www” and without.  Ask for text links with your special words in them.  Ask for links from sites that have better rankings than you have; search Alexa.com or DMOZ.org to find them.   Get and read the Bruce Clay Search Engine book.   I spent time and money to earn Clay’s SEO training certificate.  For $27, you can buy this useful book.    Read the back issues right now at http://searchoptimizationnews.com/

    4) Give face time. Make sure people know and see your photo.   Do you have an “official” current photo?   Have you plastered it as many places as possible?  I was flabbergasted at a recent association board meeting when it was asked if you should have your photo on your Web site.   You are the brand: People have to know who you are.   (GlamourShots.com will even do your hair!)

    3) Be seen and travel. Take clients, current and former, as well as prospects to dinner.  You can listen to what they want, and learn how you can serve them.  Even if people cannot make the event, they are pleased they were invited.    One on one, the ideas can flow over a bottle of wine.  One dinner at the Rainbow Room in New York this year has resulted in so much referral business I can’t believe it.  This is just #2 “face time” in person.

    2) Have testimonials available, and check them. What do people say about you on “the street”?    Find out by asking around.   Yes, have those mystery shoppers call your business, and report if someone trying to book you for a speech can — ask them to call speaker bureaus and ask about you.  Search the Web.  What information do they get?   What kind of follow up?

    1) Don’t just donate time; stake out a leadership position. At an association that can benefit from your participation, you’ll meet and help others.   I’ve volunteered at International Platform Association and will be part of its 2010 national conference.

    Mitchell P. Davis, Editor, Yearbook of Experts
    www.YearbookofExperts.com
    Broadcast Interview Source, Inc.
    2233 Wisconsin Ave, NW
    Washington, D.C.  20007
    Main phone: (202) 333-5000

    Maybe if you have a great idea, post a comment here at this blog.

    © Broadcast Interview Source, Inc.    Share this at www.NewsReleaseWire.com/23590

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    8 Points Online Marketing Plan for Authors

    Friday, August 28th, 2009
    book promotion with pam perry

    book promotion with pam perry

    This is from my PR friend and colleague, Dee Stewart. We were both participants in SORMAG’s online conference.  This is her “discussion” from the conference on the SORMAG blog.

    I want to talk to you about a specialized marketing form that has fast become the choice for publishing houses, online marketing.

    If you are an author with a contract, then you know most midlist authors and below are no longer receiving marketing support by way of product placement, instore events, book tours, and book promo items.

    Instead publishing houses are devoting a bulk of the author’s designated marketing dollars to online campaigns. And since I’ve talked about book marketing plans all year, I decided to switch the game up.

    I want to help you create an online marketing campaign that will help you meet and galvanize your ideal readers.

    Imagine as an author your day consists of writing great stories you know your readers will love, then meeting these readers to fellowship with you about your story and why they love them. Isn’t that a sweet dream? In life coaching terms we call that place- operating in your sweet spot.

    Online Marketing—if you plan your efforts well—is the best tool to get you to that sweet spot faster than any other opportunity out there. It is why your publishing houses are using it, as well as the face that it is a more affordable alternative to traditional advertising.

    Today’s session I will share basic online marketing planning tips, techniques and tricks to help you galvanize your readership. If you have further questions, you can leave a comment at the end of the post or email me at deegospelpr at gmail dot com.

    Let’s begin by defining Online Marketing.

    Marketing– is a practiced science, the ongoing process to identify, anticipate, supply and satisfy your ideal client.

    Book Marketing is the ongoing processes to identify, anticipate, supply and satisfy your ideal clients( readers, your distributors, your publishing house, bookstores.)

    Online Book Marketing: is the ongoing processes to identify, anticipate, supply and satisfy your ideal client by using online tools. It is an extension of your overall book marketing campaign.

    Let me repeat: Online Book Marketing is an extension of your overall book marketing toolbox. Do not stop your other marketing efforts!

    Now I will introduce you to seven basic online marketing tools and how to prepare a strategy to use them.

    The 8 Point Online Marketing Toolbox

    1. Email Marketing
    2. Blogging, including Podcasting, Vlogging & Microblogging
    3. Social Media Design
    4. Forum Building
    5. Online Advertising
    6. Online PR
    7. Social Bookmarking

    A more detailed look:

    Email Marketing: Email marketing is a public relations, customer relations management, direct mailing Trifecta (PR/CRM/DM.) You can participate in three marketing processes at once. What’s very good about email marketing is that your direct mailing efforts have a better return on investment(ROI) when you couple it with a client connection piece—consistent, compelling and strategic email placements to your ideal readers.

    Blogging: Online Journaling (blogging) Many authors blog to share their writing life with their readers. Blogging can be used for various reasons:

    · To serve as an online hub for your fanbase
    · To serve as your newsletter content builder
    · To promote your next event
    · To attract event planners and bookclubs
    · To serve as an online bookstore
    · To serve as an online press room
    · To attract agents and editors
    · To create another source of writing revenue
    · To host an online blogtour
    · To podcast your book
    · To videocast(vlog) your book

    The key to blogging is commitment, consistence and content. Join me in September for 30 Days to Build a Better Book Blog at http://www.christianfiction.blogspot.com

    Social Media Design: Despite the contrary authors should have a strategy and design in place when you are online. This design consists of scheduling, tooling, and driving readers from event to event. Tools like brightkite, eventbrite, igoogle, ping.fm, and squidoo helps you create almost an online (ro)bot of you, whereby you are promoting yourself 24-7 streaming and responding to your ideal readers and clients in real time. The top social media building blocks for authors are:

    · Twitter
    · Facebook
    · Amazon Author Pages
    · Eventbrite
    · BrightKite
    · Skype
    · FriendFeed
    · LiveStream
    · YouTube
    · BlogTalkRadio
    · TalkShoe
    · MySpace
    · GoodReads
    · LibraryThing
    · Flickr

    Forum Building: Fan bases grow exponentially when they form a community. The Twilight Moms Club on Mommy Blogger is a huge community that talks about the series, meet regularly and host charity events. If you’re operating in your sweet spot your fans will come together and create a fun and exciting community for you as well. The best way to do that is through forum building. Couple your email campaign with a forum to continue conversations in and you have a winning combination. A great example of a blog that created a community with a forum is Faith*in*Fiction. Bethany House Editor David Long created the blog to start a conversation about compelling Christian novels. It is the catalyst for The Christian Fiction Blog Alliance, Relief Journal, First Wildcard Blog Tours, and over 150 Christian book review blogs.

    The top forum building sites for authors are:

    · Ning
    · Facebook Groups
    · Twitter Groups
    · GoodReads Groups
    · Utterli Groups
    · MySpace Book Groups
    · Shelfari Groups
    · YahooGroups
    · Blogger Fan Groups

    Online Advertising – paid for placement. Examples of book ads are (ads in print & online publications, radio, internet or network television, blogs, etc.) Its goal is immediate promotional impact and short lived. It’s results can be measured via survey, tracking backlinks and sneeze page hits. It is the most expensive form of marketing. When you create your plan it is imperative to use online ads to promote your next event or next title, and most effective when creating and implementing book launch strategy. Where can you find online advertise placements?

    · Online Mags like SORMAG
    · Blogs like Christian Fiction Blog
    http://www.christianfiction.blogspot.com
    · You can submit ads/drops to online radio shows like Media Candy www.blogtalkradio.com/mediacandy
    · Social Media Sites like Facebook Ads
    · Internet TV Shows like Faithful Folios on LiveStream
    · Eblast services like GoodGirlBookClub. Make sure to include in your plan to purchase eblast service from a local service, a genre specific service, a national magazine.
    · Link Ads in online newsletters like Dee’s Goody Mail
    · Book Trailers on DeeGospel on YouTube
    · Sponsoring online events like SORMAG Online Conference
    · Paying for a Blog Tour through Ty Moody Creations
    · Ad placements on Literary Sites like Booktour.com

    Online Public Relations & CRM – the activity to create opportunities to build relationships with your readers gatekeepers and to promote your service, product and brand. It is not a guaranteed sale, cannot be measured short-term, but affects are longer and more lasting than advertising. Customer Relations Management (CRM) is tied to PR, because PR also handles crisis management and customer feedback and retention. Online PR & CRM activities are:

    Online Book Tours like CFBA
    Online Audio Interviews like From Cover to Cover Literary Talk Show
    Online Book club meetings using SKYPE or Mogalus
    Book review placements on Christian Fiction Blog or RAWSISTAZ
    Online mag interview opps like Victorious Living
    Radio opps like Ella Curry’s BAN
    Speaking opps like Nia Promotions’ Online Teleseminars
    Online Parties via Twitter and Facebook and BrightKite

    Social BookMarking– social bookmarking is a referral activity for bloggers. Blog readers find a great service or read and the refer what they like through social bookmarking sites like:

    · Dig
    · Mahalo
    · StumbledUpon
    · Delicious
    · Librarything
    · Facebook
    · BookTour

    Become very familiar with this tool and implore your readers to do the same.

    Direct Selling – your website or blog is the lifeblood of your online presence. Moreover you can create a buyer’s page to navigate readers to direct selling. It is best practice to provide your local booksense tour, an online bookstore and an affiliate link with either Amazon, Borders or Faithpoint. To be able to watch the activity from your site setup a google analytics account and put the code inside or have your website designer place the code and provide monthly reports about your site’s activity. On that site make sure you have both audio and visual components of who you are and your book, preferably, you the author.

    In short, let me share what these services should do for you. Online Marketing – is not the same as CRM, although social networking is a tool for both CRM, publicity, advertising, direct sales, and direct mailing. Online Marketing is using the 4ps of marketing process online.

    Identify readers with online research using SMS, bookmarking, blogging, podcasting, polling.

    Anticipating reader needs via polling, forum building, e-newsletter campaign strategy
    Supply readers by introducing your answer to their wants and needs by creating an effective product launch strategy using online hubs, blogs and supplying online snippets in audio, video and print forms via viral sms like Twitter, Facebook, MySpace, Viddler, YouTube, UStream, Skype, Utterz

    Satisfy readers by enabling your book e-reader capable with ebooks and sony reader and Kindle Ready.

    Dee Stewart is a writing diva mother, publicist, inspirational book reviewer for Romantic Times Magazine, Atlanta Satellite Bookseller for Mocha Readers Bookstores, and owner of Christian Fiction Blog(www.christianfiction.blogspot.com) and The Christian Fiction Network(christianfiction.ning.com). Her writings have appeared in: Spirit Led Woman, Gospel Today, Good Girl Book Club, The Dabbling Mum, Atlanta Christian Family, Mosaic Literary, Precious Times, Vertical Fix just a few. She will be featured in SistahFaith Anthology(Simon & Schuster, Feb. 2010.) Follow her on Twitter at @DeeGospel. Or visit my site at http://www.deestewart.com or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/dee.stewart

    “This fall I will be hosting a six week Media Candy book marketing session for a very affordable rate. Let me know if you are interested in more details. Also in the fall my site www.deegospelpr.com will become a membership site, whereby you can download free reports, ebooks, tip sheets, bookclub contact info, participate in some of my free teleseminars, podcasts receive discounts for group coaching and marketing products, literary agents accepting submissions, book festival panel speaking opps, an invitation to apply to become a speaker’s bureau member, and much more more for a low fee of $25 a month.

    Also see: www.e-junkie.com/pamperry for FREE Ebook & PR materials (cds, books, etc)

    7 Book Promotion Methods for Your Nonfiction Book (Guest Blog)

    Monday, June 8th, 2009

    There are two things every author must know about book promotion for your nonfiction book. First, it is your responsibility, no matter what publishing method you use – conventional, print on demand (POD), or self-publishing. Second, promotion should begin long before your book is finished. In fact, you should be thinking about it from the very beginning of the planning process.

    One of the first questions you should ask yourself is who are my readers? Once you have identified your target market, your next step is to find ways to tell them what the book is about; what problem it will solve; why it is funny, informative, or moving; who wrote it and why; and, most important, why they want to spend money to own your book. What follows are seven proven book promotion ways to reach your readers with this information:

    1. Create a website for your book.

    You must have a presence on the Internet for solid book promotion and book marketing. A Website showcases your book, highlights the cover, introduces you as an expert author, delineates the main points, tells where the book may be purchased, and provides a place for testimonials. A Website doesn’t have to be expensive or elaborate, but it should be professionally designed and constructed. Unless you are a Web guru, invest in a professional Website designer.

    2. Brainstorm ideas for book promotion and book marketing.

    Gather a group of your most creative friends to generate as many ideas as you can (It’s a good idea to feed them). Break your reading audience into subgroups, and list all the places to find them. Where do they hang out? What organizations do they belong to? Where do they shop? What are their passions, hobbies, and vocations? The spreadsheet you create is the beginning of your promotional plan.

    3. Send advance readers’ copies (ARCs) to promote your book.

    When the book is finished but not yet published, send bound copies of Galley proofs to book reviewers at print and electronic media. Be sure to stamp them “Reader’s Copy” or “Galley Proof.” You want to time the reviews to coincide with the publication and availability of your book. Reviewers want to read it before it hits the shelves. Timing is everything.

    4. Submit articles to promote your book.

    Your book is a goldmine of article ideas. Every major point is an article ready to be excerpted or paraphrased. Once you know what your target audience is reading, you have a list of potential publications, print and electronic. Write a 25- and 50-word author’s blurb to be printed at the end of every article. When you submit to an online article Website, indicate that the article may be reprinted at no charge, as long as it includes the author’s blurb.

    5. Take part in book fairs as a great book promotion tool.

    Share a table or booth with other writers or with members of an association of which you are a member, if it is relevant to your topic. Book fairs can mean long hours on your feet if you go it alone; but, when you share the workload, the experience can be fun and rewarding. You’ll meet new people, reach readers directly, and become personally involved in selling your book.

    6. Share what you know to become an expert in your field.

    Offer to give free presentations at bookstores and other venues that carry your book. This is a great way to build your reputation as an expert in your field, provide value to the bookseller and the book buyer, and connect directly with your readers. It’s good for your ego to be asked to sign your own book. One caveat: if you don’t feel comfortable speaking in front of a group, join Toastmasters or hire a speaking coach. Don’t muddle through your presentation.

    7. Assemble a book sales package.

    Put together a press kit to send to local radio and TV stations. Include a news release with pertinent information about the book and future scheduled appearances, an author’s bio, talking points to use in an on-air interview, a sample book cover, background information, and favorable reviews and testimonials. A press kit is like a resume; it gets you in the door. Once you get there, the rest is up to you.

    Promoting your book is an ongoing project. It isn’t something you do once and then move on. As long as your book is available and there are potential readers who could enjoy it and benefit from reading it, you have a job to do. This is, after all, why you wrote it.

    About the Author

    Bobbi Linkemer is a ghostwriter, editor, and the author of 12 books under her own name. She has been a professional writer for 40 years, a magazine editor and journalist, and a book-writing teacher. Her clients range from Fortune 100 companies to entrepreneurs who want to write books in order to enhance their credibility and build their businesses. Visit her Website at: http://www.WriteANonfictionBook.com

    5 Different Kinds of Articles You Can Write to Promote Your Book

    Thursday, May 21st, 2009

    Writing articles to promote your book can be a super way to let readers know
    about your area of expertise and encourage them to learn more by purchasing your
    book.

    Write articles to promote your book

    Write articles to promote your book

    Here are 5 different kinds of articles you can write that will make it easy for you to put together a portfolio of articles to promote your book.

    1. How To articles are always fun and highly informational. They get right to the point and the reader is sure to take something away that they can use
    immediately.

    2. Opinion or “op-ed” is an article that is sure to get a response. This article is
    used to write a convincing and persuasive article that is opposite the popular
    viewpoints on the subject matter.

    3. Reflection articles are interesting because the writer is able to pour out the feelings and emotions from a particular experience in a free way.

    4. Case Study articles present a problem and then lay out how it was solved by a certain person or group.

    5. Compilation articles are basically the opinions or questions and answers of
    multiple sources compiled into one article to present a message.
    Take the time to decide which article type is best for you and enjoy the
    benefits of using articles to promote your book.

    See all my articles at Ezine Articles on book marketing and publicity.

    See The PR Pro Coach Shop for digital products and shoot me

    an email if you have questions.